Tag Archives: William Morrow & Co.

Review: The Other Mother

The Other Mother

The Other Mother
By Carol Goodman
William Morrow & Company, 9780062819833, March 27, 2018, 352pp.

The Short of It:

This book will have you second guessing everything you read. It’s impossible to put down once you pick it up because every single page has crazy stamped all over it.

The Rest of It:

I’m not even sure I can write this review without giving something away so I am going to keep it brief.

Daphne Marist is suffering from postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter Chloe. She joins a support group at the suggestion of her husband Peter, hoping to find other moms struggling with the same issues. There, she meets Lauren, also with a daughter named Chloë. But Lauren is more pulled together and polished. Daphne can’t help but be in awe of her. That is just the beginning of her problems.

That’s about all I can say without giving anything away but Goodman knows how to keep you guessing and she does it well. Sometimes these unreliable narrators come off as hokey or not well done but that is not the case here. I’d turn a page and go, “Wait what?” and then have to go back a little to see if my eyes were playing tricks on me.

This story is crazy with a capital C but oh so fun to read. Plus, this book can be read in one sitting. Once I picked it up I just kept reading because I had to know how the story would end.

This is the perfect book to toss into your beach bag but not if you want to actually pay attention to the gorgeous views because your nose will be in the book the entire time.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Advertisements

Review: Sunburn

Sunburn

Sunburn
By Laura Lippman
William Morrow & Company, 9780062389923, February 2018, 304pp.

The Short of It:

Manipulation & motive will keep you guessing with this one.

The Rest of It:

Sunburn has gotten a lot of buzz and for good reason. It has a cold, rather calculated protagonist. One that you can’t quite figure out which makes this read hard to put down.

Pauline walks away from her husband and child while on vacation. She heads to a small town, finds a job in a small little bar, puts herself up in a modest apartment, reinvents herself as “Polly”,  and then… falls in love.

Why has she walked away from her family? Why has a private investigator been hired to track her? Who is paying for his services? What is Pauline hiding? Plenty.

What makes this a fascinating read is Pauline. She is like a cat. She always lands on her feet no matter what she’s been dealt but she’s not always likable. Guys seem to like her, which she uses to her advantage but women? No. Women do not like her and this is where she finds herself challenged.

I think Lippman spent quite a bit of time developing Pauline’s character. She’s very complex. I found myself not liking her but then I would turn a page and I’d get a glimmer of something similar to like. She is a very strong character and personality and yet there is a vulnerability to her which makes the story plausible.

Sunburn is not a perfect read. There are some stereotypes and moments where you’ll question some of the plot lines,  but all this year I have been reading books that have been pegged as page-turners and this one definitely falls into that category. I guess you could call it a mystery but I didn’t see it as such.

That said, I liked it quite a bit.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.