Tag Archives: Fiction

Review: Bird Box

Bird Box

Bird Box
By Josh Malerman
Ecco Press, 9780062259660, February 2015, 272pp.

The Short of It:

Tense, and absolutely riveting.

The Rest of It:

I don’t know where I was when this book first came out a couple of years ago but I am so glad I finally discovered it.

The world has changed. There are monsters. If you see these creatures with the naked eye or even through a lens of any kind, you instantly go stark raving mad and kill yourself. How does one survive such a world? By living behind a blindfold for the rest of your life.

Now add children.

Now add animals.

Now add people who buck the system and want to “test” the different theories out on their own even though they’ve been warned that the outcome will not be good.

Food is running out. Potable water is an issue as well. As these people live behind blindfolds, these creatures live among them. They stand over them. They toy with them. They try to lure them out of darkness.

This is a terrifying world and I loved every tense moment. I picked this up for the RIP Challenge but it is easily one of the best books I’ve read this year.

Have you read it? If you love “end of the world” type stories but also love a good, suspenseful tale, then I beg you to run out and find a copy. Go. Right now.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

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Review: My Absolute Darling

My Absolute Darling

My Absolute Darling
By Gabriel Tallent
Riverhead Books, 9780735211179, August 2017, 432pp.

*Trigger Warning: Child Abuse/Sexual Abuse*

The Short of It:

An impossibly brave girl, her abusive father and the relationship they have between them will keep you turning the pages but it’s brutal and raw and gut-wrenching at times.

The Rest of It:

The title might suggest affection, but it’s the twisted “affection” that this father displays for his fourteen-old that will have you squirming every time he enters the room. Friends, this was a tough read. Why so tough? Because as you might not guess, the girl, known as Turtle, loves her father deeply. She realizes at a very young age that they are both damaged and there is a beauty in that. A beauty that is constantly evaluated as these two co-exist in a town, that for the most part, turns a blind eye to what is going on.

How can two damaged people survive without one another? Is it even possible? That is the question and the author does a very good job of presenting the love/hate relationship that these two have. I actually caught myself pitying the father at one point. And for every ounce of pity I had for him, I had the same amount of anger for Turtle. I caught myself putting some of the blame on her and then I’d put the book down and sit there shaking my head over it.

This author wrings all the feelings out of you. For those who have read the book, I’m not sure the ending worked for me but thinking about it, I’m not sure what exactly I’d change if I could.

As I noted at the top of this review, this book could be a trigger for anyone who suffered from child abuse or sexual abuse of any kind and it’s not clearly noted anywhere in the blurbs I’ve read.

My Absolute Darling has what I would call one of the most complex protagonists ever. Turtle is damn near feral but she’s so vulnerable and fragile too. If you can stomach the abuse that she suffers, then you will be rewarded with beautiful prose. At times I was reminded of A Little Life which gut-punched me over and over again.

An important read, but read with care.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.