Tag Archives: Fave Reads

Review: Verity

Verity
Verity
By Colleen Hoover
Grand Central Publishing, 9781538724736, October 2021, 336pp.

The Short of It:

Now that I’ve read it, I can see why it received all the hype.

The Rest of It:

A popular author is unable to complete her bestselling book series after a life-changing accident. Her husband, searches for the perfect co-author to complete the series on Verity’s behalf. But in order to do the work, Lowen  must move into the Crawford’s house temporarily in order to have access to Verity’s many files. But she immediately regrets her decision.

This family has suffered numerous tragedies. The death of their daughter Chastin, and then the accidental drowning of her twin sister shortly thereafter. Leaving Jeremy to pull the pieces back together. Taking care of his wife day in and day out and trying to raise their son Crew proves to be a lot so a nurse is hired. But this brings no peace to Lowen as she observes this family.

Verity is always staring at her. She’s supposed to be beyond awareness, but Lowen doesn’t believe it. She believes that she might be exaggerating her injuries, but for what purpose? Plus, after spending days with Jeremy, seeing his pain, Lowen begins to fall for him which is a recipe for disaster.

This book was quite readable and hard to put down. It’s got a little bit of mystery and suspense going for it, and there are some racy bits which is why I caution my younger readers to skip this one until you are older. I can absolutely see why it’s so popular. It seems to have pulled me out of a reading slump.

Have you read it?

Source: Purchased
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: Sea of Tranquility

Sea of Tranquility

Sea of Tranquility
By Emily St. John Mandel
Knopf, 9780593321447, April 2022, 272pp.

The Short of It:

Reading Mandel guarantees exploratory thought processes.

The Rest of It:

Summing this story up is not easy. It’s a little bit of everything. There’s space exploration in the form of airships to other worlds, time travel, very interesting characters who float between this world and the next. Really, the story asks the question, what if what we are living in is a simulation? A carefully constructed “reality” that is anything but real?

Sounds wild, right? It is and it’s fascinating the way Mandel takes these characters through different time periods. As with most time travel stories, changes made anywhere within the continuum impact things down the line. Mandel softly tiptoes around this as her characters are warned over and over again what the end result will be. And in the midst of all of this, one of those time periods involves a pandemic.

I really enjoyed this short novel. It provided so much food for thought and was really well done. If you loved Station Eleven, you will appreciate this story as well.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.