Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

Review: Soul Keeping

Soul Keeping

Soul Keeping
By John Ortberg
Zondervan Publishing Company, 9780310275978, April 2014, 210pp.

The Short of It:

If you’ve ever felt disconnected spiritually, there’s a good chance your soul was at the heart of it.

The Rest of It:

My life group read this book for our study and it was an interesting read. These kinds of books always seem to fall into my lap at the right time.

For the past few months I’ve felt “broken”, for lack of a better term. Just run down and ragged. I do all the right things and yet still feel empty sometimes. It’s the day-to-day routine that gets me. Waking up at 4 a.m., going to bed at 11 p.m. Same. Same. Same. I’v had enough. This book attempts to address this type of thing. If your soul is not good, the rest of you won’t be either.

I thought my soul was okay. Pretty good, actually. But after reading the book I see that my soul is not the center of my focus. I am now attempting to correct that. Did I get everything I wanted out of this book that I expected to? No. It left me feeling a little unsatisfied and flat. What Ortberg says, I agree with 100%. The important stuff needs to come first and the other stuff falls behind it. But the voice seemed off to me. It was a little repetitive and didn’t sound all that sincere even though Ortberg struggled with the very same thing.

All in all, I’m not sure my life group got a lot out of it. I think it would have worked better as a short video series or a podcast.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

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Review: Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?
By Frans de Waal
W. W. Norton & Company, 9780393353662, April 2017, 352pp.

The Short of It:

An interesting look at animal intelligence.

The Rest of It:

This was a fascinating read and also an interesting choice for a book club selection. Definitely not something I would have picked up on my own. Basically, Frans de Waal’s work involves experiments and tests to determine just how intelligent animals are and whether or not some of their intelligence is inferred by humans.

What I found interesting is how difference species would solve the same problem in different ways, given their exposure to certain situations and whether outside influences such as being fed before a study could affect the outcome. A lot of these experiments are food based so a chimpanzee who has been fed beforehand, may react differently than one who has not.

I have a dog. I think she is brilliant. I believe she has full thoughts and works through problems in a systematic manner. But after reading this book, I realize that most of her action is cued by me, unknowingly. The way I stand, the way I may look at a certain object are giving her clues on how to behave. Interesting, huh?

If you have any interest in animal intelligence at all then this book will fascinate you. Frans de Waal has a VERY interesting TED Talk on his work if you’d like to check it out.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.