Tag Archives: Knopf

Review: Killing Commendatore

Killing Commendatore

Killing Commendatore
By Haruki Murakami
Knopf, 9780525520047, October 2018, 704pp.

The Short of It:

In my opinion, this is one of his most linear works and yet it possesses all of the key elements that Murakami fans have come to expect from his work.

The Rest of It:

I spent a lot of time reading this one. Not because it was long and dense, but because each and every sentence begged to be read again. Much of it was beautifully written, but some of it was puzzling which is why I love Murakami so much. He takes an idea and just goes with it.

In this story, an artist, recently separated from his wife, heads to a remote, hilltop home to do what he does best, paint. But in this house he finds a painting that basically, changes his life. The painting titled, Killing Commendatore, is a violent depiction of what is basically an assassination. An “idea” takes the shape of a very small man. There is a deep pit in the forest which will remind readers of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. There’s a young girl, a faceless guy, a menacing man who drives a Subaru, an impressionable aunt, and a very mysterious man who lives in a white mansion across the way.

If you ever felt intimidated by Murakami in the past, this is the book for you.  I think there is a lot to relate to in this one. The overall theme of loneliness, isolation, what it means to be married and loved and generally, what can be found at the core of each human being and how that can shift depending on the circumstances.

I can see Murakami winning an award for this one. It seems to embody everything he’s ever written and yet remain so unique. I highly recommend it.

Source: Purchased
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

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Review: The Thirst

The Thirst

The Thirst
By Jo Nesbø
Knopf Publishing Group, Hardcover, 9780385352161, May 8, 2017, 480pp.

The Short of It:

Harry Hole is back and this one does not disappoint.

The Rest of It:

When a crazy lunatic goes on a murdering spree, Harry Hole comes out of retirement. The murderer’s weapon? A set of steel teeth and it’s just a grisly as you imagine only with a lot less gore than previous novels and not nearly as twisted.

Harry Hole fans will be really happy with this one. It’s fast-paced, suspenseful and not riddled with red herrings. It kept me guessing and I had a really hard time putting it down to do things like feed my family or sleep.  I really like how the story came together so I highly recommend it to anyone who loves Harry, but also to anyone who just wants to read good crime fiction. As with all of the Harry Hole books, it does help to know some of Harry’s backstory but enough is provided for you to get a good picture of who you are dealing with.

If  you gave up on Nesbø because of his last few books, give him another go because this one was great.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.