Tag Archives: Marriage

Review: The Other Mrs. Miller

The Other Mrs. Miller

The Other Mrs. Miller
By Allison Dickson
G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 9780525539247,  July 2019, 352pp.

The Short of It:

I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect from this one but what I got was an enjoyable, twisty read.

The Rest of It:

Phoebe and her husband live in a fairly well-to-do neighborhood. Mostly due to the fact that she came from money but not money that she likes to flaunt given that her father’s wandering eyes got him into a whole lot of trouble with young women all over. Although comfortable financially, her marriage is falling apart, she’s let herself go, and she wakes each day unhappy and anxious.

One morning, she notices a car parked across the street and the same car arrives daily. Could this be something related to her father’s dealings? As she becomes increasingly paranoid over this intrusion of privacy, a new family moves in across the street.

To Phoebe, this family provides a much-needed distraction until things get out of hand. Vicki and Phoebe get too close, too fast. Jake, Vicki’s eighteen-year-old son provides the type of distraction that an unsatisfied wife may seek but certainly does not need. All in all, both these families become entwined in a way that no one expects. I was honestly surprised at the direction the story took. It’s good, and twisty and fun. I am loving these types of books lately.

If you like a story that keeps you guessing, then pick up The Other Mrs. Miller soon.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: A Good Neighborhood

A Good Neighborhood

A Good Neighborhood
By Therese Anne Fowler
St. Martin’s Press, 9781250237279, March 10, 2020, 320pp.

The Short of It:

Absolutely riveting.

The Rest of It:

I wanted an excellent book to kick-off 2020 and let me tell you, A Good Neighborhood was just that.

The story is set in a North Carolina neighborhood that has some history behind it but is in the midst of modernization. Old, beautiful homes being razed for sparkly new homes, and the types of residents you’d expect with such flashiness. Two homes, next to each other have their own stories. One, old and beloved by Valerie and her son Xavier. The other, flashy and new, owned by Brad, his wife Julia and their two children, Juniper and Lily.

One black family. One white. Although one has a little more money than the other due to some opportunistic business dealings, the other is well-educated and well-respected in the community. But when Valerie’s grand oak tree begins to show signs  of distress due to all the construction that her neighbor authorized, tensions rise and when Juniper, a white girl, falls in love with Xavier, the tension really ramps up.

This is a timely story of how one thing leads to another and how race can’t help but get in the way. The way the story is told is from an observer’s point of view, so we know early on that something horrible happens to one if these families and although we see hints here and there of how the story will play out, the ending still packs a punch. I finished this book late at night and I was so affected by the storytelling that I had to sit there for many minutes to compose myself.

This is a tragic story and will break your heart in so many ways but it’s so well done. It gives you much to think about. It would make an excellent book club read and I want everyone to read it.

I should note that the book comes out in March, so pre-order it now or request it from your library and once you read it, let me know because you will need to discuss it.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.