Isolation Day #?

My city, all locked up.

Everyone has lost track of the days, right? I didn’t self-isolate until a bit later due to my work schedule but I am doing it now and the days blend into one another. It would be great if we had some sun to break it up. It’s been cloudy and dreary. My dog lies in wait for a random sun beam to stream in from the window.

How is everyone doing? Some of my friends are reporting flu-like symptoms. Others are losing their minds, or starting to, over their young children being cooped up at home. Husbands and wives everywhere are getting on each other’s nerves.

As rough as it is, and for as long as we have to do this, we will survive. It just seems like such a long time and with no definitive end in sight. What I love though is how the community is coming together to make some things accessible to all, like online dance classes, or Broadway shows streamed for free. My daughter took a class with Debbie Allen the other day. Remember her from the TV show Fame? That is how we are getting through this.

Ideally, this would be a great time to read. I am doing better in this area now. When this all started I was so distracted. Too distracted to read but now, I am feeling a little more at ease and starting to look forward to reading again. Of course, the right book helps and the one I am reading now, The Women in the Dark is just the book I needed to get back into it. The story immediately grabbed me.

This has been a year but I offer this, someday this will be in the past.

 

Review: Miracle Creek

Miracle Creek

Miracle Creek
By Angie Kim
Sarah Crichton Books, 9780374156022, April 2019, 368pp.

The Short of It:

I do not know what I thought this book was about before reading it but I certainly didn’t think it was about a hyperbaric oxygen therapy accident.

The Rest of It:

I simplified that blurb a little because Miracle Creek opens with a terrible accident but then quickly turns into a court room drama, a mystery, a story with an immigration thread and even a bit of scandal.

Young, Pak, and their teen daughter Mary, run a hyperbaric oxygen therapy business that they call Miracle Submarine. Adults and children, enter the chamber to partake of its healing properties. On this particular day, the normal group enters but there is a terrible explosion which kills one adult and one, autistic child, Henry. The accident leaves several other injured as well.

It’s believed that Elizabeth set the fire which caused the oxygen tanks to explode. Elizabeth being the mother of Henry.  The prosecution believes that she wanted her child dead, due to his burdening care. This triggers all kinds of thoughts about the care for special need kids.

The story bounces between characters. Who did it? Who set the fire? Why? Many of the witnesses are lying but for different reasons. In all honesty, this story was difficult to get through. There is a lot of back and forth and even though it revolves around just a  handful of characters, I had to keep reminding myself who they were.

However, the ending… the ending was beautiful and sad and left me with thoughts about how hard it would be to care for a special needs child. How hard it is for people from other countries to make a living here. How hard it is to fit in. So I think in the end, I liked it much more than I thought I would.

I read this for my book club discussion which was cancelled due to social distancing but we may try to meet via Zoom so we can discuss it. Have you read it?

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

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