Tag Archives: Ruth Ware

Review: The Turn of the Key

The Turn of the Key

The Turn of the Key 
By Ruth Ware
Gallery/Scout Press, 9781501188770,  August 2019, 352pp.

The Short of It:

I needed a book that I could not put down and this was it.

The Rest of It:

Nanny stories are quite popular. Add a supernatural element, difficult kids, weird parents and a big, spooky house and you have a winner. Now add technology. I mean, cameras, apps, smart refrigerators and TVs and you up the creep factor by 100%.

Rowan finds the nanny position of a lifetime. A high-paying, live-in gig that will take her to the beautiful Scottish moors. The house is unique. An old Victorian in the front, but the back half of the house is all gleaming and new, outfitted with the latest technology. At first, Rowan is impressed by this. Sandra and Bill, architects by trade, restored what they could but re-imagined the rest but all of its gadgetry proves to be a bit much for Rowan when she is immediately tasked with watching the children for ten days while the parents are at a business conference.

Did I mention that the last four nannies all left within a two-year period? Or that the house has a history of death and violence? Or that some in the town believe it to be haunted?

This was such a fun book to read. I was completely immersed and could not turn those pages fast enough. It’s sufficiently creepy and keeps you guessing with all its plot twists. The ending felt a tad rushed but overall, I really enjoyed this one and found it to be really entertaining and fun. I read it in one day. A work day, which should tell you something.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: The Woman in Cabin 10

The Woman in Cabin 10

The Woman in Cabin 10
By Ruth Ware
Gallery/Scout Press, Hardcover, 9781501132933, July 19, 2016, 352pp.

The Short of It:

The Woman in Cabin 10 is seriously hard to put down and every time I did, I was even more excited to pick it up again.

The Rest of It:

Because her boss is unable to make the trip, Lo Blacklock takes her place on the maiden voyage of the Aurora, a luxury cruise ship headed for the fjords of Norway. This is an opportunity of a lifetime for Lo, whose journalistic career has been less than stellar. For a travel writer, a trip like this could really turn her career around.

A few days before the trip, her apartment is burglarized and her face-to-face run-in with the burglar prompts her to re-live the anxiety attacks she’s experienced in the past. Armed with anxiety medication and fortified by drink, she decides not to let the incident stop her and boards the ship with a small, but select group of guests. When Lo witnesses what she believes to be a murder, her anxiety spirals out-of-control as she tries to get the ship’s staff to take her seriously.

The Woman in Cabin 10 is what I wanted The Girl on the Train to be. Lo is an unreliable narrator. Her affinity for drink and her anxiety cause you to second guess her at every turn but at the same time, she’s likable and you can’t help but feel sorry for her. The story is good. It keeps you guessing without being too obvious. and the pacing is tight.  It’s suspenseful and twisty in all the right places.

Basically, it’s exactly what you want in a summer read. I am dying to get my hands on more books like this one because it sure gave me something to look forward to while on lunch at work!

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.