Tag Archives: Gallery/Scout Press

Review: Did You Ever Have a Family

Did You Ever Have a Family

Did You Ever Have a Family
By Bill Clegg
Gallery/Scout Press, Paperback, 9781476798189, May 2016, 320pp.

The Short of It:

Grief is processed in many different ways and Clegg manages to capture all of them in this beautifully written novel.

The Rest of It:

On the eve of her daughter’s wedding, June Reid’s life is forever changed when she loses her daughter, her daughter’s fiance, her ex-husband and her boyfriend in a tragic accident. Losing what is essentially her entire family, June packs her car and heads to a town where she can be alone for awhile.

Each character plays a role in the telling of this story. Some characters are more superfluous than others, yet all of them are important to the end result. As June makes her way across the country, other people also affected by this accident, are forced to come to terms with their own grief.

This is a tragic story about an imperfect family trying to come together to celebrate this joyous day and instead what they have is pain, sorrow and regret over what they didn’t say or didn’t do. There are beautiful, touching moments between these characters which makes the reading more an exploration of grief than a sad, heavy story about loss.

I really loved how the story came together at the end. It was a very satisfying read as far as books go and my book club had plenty to discuss. I highly recommend it.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: The Woman in Cabin 10

The Woman in Cabin 10

The Woman in Cabin 10
By Ruth Ware
Gallery/Scout Press, Hardcover, 9781501132933, July 19, 2016, 352pp.

The Short of It:

The Woman in Cabin 10 is seriously hard to put down and every time I did, I was even more excited to pick it up again.

The Rest of It:

Because her boss is unable to make the trip, Lo Blacklock takes her place on the maiden voyage of the Aurora, a luxury cruise ship headed for the fjords of Norway. This is an opportunity of a lifetime for Lo, whose journalistic career has been less than stellar. For a travel writer, a trip like this could really turn her career around.

A few days before the trip, her apartment is burglarized and her face-to-face run-in with the burglar prompts her to re-live the anxiety attacks she’s experienced in the past. Armed with anxiety medication and fortified by drink, she decides not to let the incident stop her and boards the ship with a small, but select group of guests. When Lo witnesses what she believes to be a murder, her anxiety spirals out-of-control as she tries to get the ship’s staff to take her seriously.

The Woman in Cabin 10 is what I wanted The Girl on the Train to be. Lo is an unreliable narrator. Her affinity for drink and her anxiety cause you to second guess her at every turn but at the same time, she’s likable and you can’t help but feel sorry for her. The story is good. It keeps you guessing without being too obvious. and the pacing is tight.  It’s suspenseful and twisty in all the right places.

Basically, it’s exactly what you want in a summer read. I am dying to get my hands on more books like this one because it sure gave me something to look forward to while on lunch at work!

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.