Tag Archives: Missing Girls

Review: Invisible Girl

Invisible Girl 
By Lisa Jewell
Atria Books, 9781982137335, October 13, 2020, 368pp.

The Short of It:

There are a few side stories going on which normally distract me but they came together very nicely here.

The Rest of It:

The “Invisible Girl” in the title is not necessarily the main character of this novel which is interesting in and of itself. Saffyre Maddox is seeking treatment for self-harm. Her therapist, Roan Fours has been very good for her but after three years, he’s ready to cut her loose, feeling that she’s addressed her main reason for therapy. But Saffyre’s real reason is the abuse she suffered as a young child and she hasn’t even gotten to that part yet. Feeling abandoned, she becomes slightly obsessed with Roan and follows him around only to discover that he is hiding something from his family.

Owen Pick, is a neighbor across the street from Roan Fours. He lives with his aunt at the age of thirty and doesn’t know how to act around women. His awkwardness has caused numerous issues, including a workplace harassment case at the college he has been suspended from. His accidental interaction with Saffyre becomes a problem when she goes missing.

There are basically three main players in this story: Saffyre, Owen, and Roan. Other characters add to the complexity of what is going on, but don’t play major roles in what goes down. Jewell handles this quite well. I mean, no one seems “extra” just for the sake of being there. They all serve a purpose to propel the story forward in some way.

I’ve heard some say that there is a lot going on in this story. This is true but I felt that it was deftly navigated and had just the right pace for me to keep picking it up. Plus, Jewell is very good at characterization. I cared about these characters and wanted them to be okay, except for the ones who didn’t deserve it of course.

Overall, a solid read with a nicely wrapped up ending.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: Emma in the Night

Emma in the Night
By Wendy Walker
St. Martin’s Griffin, 9781250141422, August 2018, 336pp.

The Short of It:

No one can be trusted.

The Rest of It:

Three years ago the Tanner sisters disappeared without a trace. One day, Cass shows up on her mother’s doorstep, three years older but without her sister, Emma. When the investigators are called in to question her, she urgently pleads for them to find Emma, who is hopefully still on the island she just escaped from.

The investigators don’t fully believe the story Cass is telling them. Something is off. To complicate things, Cass and Emma’s mother is narcissistic and continues to turn the attention back to herself anytime Cass or Emma is in the spotlight. One of the investigators, Dr. Winter,  is very familiar with this disorder since she dealt with it in her own childhood so she watches them all carefully to see if she can decipher what really happened to Emma and Cass.

Emma in the Night is super twisty and delves into some much deeper issues than you might expect. This family is beyond dysfunctional and no one can be trusted which makes for good reading. Until the final pages, I had an idea of what happened to them but nothing solid and I was somewhat off when it was finally revealed.

This is a smart, highly detailed story about a seriously messed-up family. It’s gritty and some parts will leave you cringing. Some of the story lines could be triggering as well so be warned. Overall, I’d recommend it.

Source: Purchased
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.