Tag Archives: Literary Fiction

Review: Father’s Day

Father's Day

Father’s Day
By Simon Van Booy
Harper, Hardcover, 9780062408945, April 2016, 304pp.

The Short of It:

A quiet non-traditional story about a father’s love for his daughter.

The Rest of It:

Harvey is just a young girl when her parents are killed in an accident. After the accident, Harvey is placed with Jason, her uncle, who was recently released from prison for a crime he committed as a teen. The two have a lot to learn and with the help of his social worker, Jason learns that fathers aren’t perfect and that the love of a child is something you have to hold dear.

I really enjoyed this story even though I found it to be very different from what I’ve previously read by this author. The language isn’t as poetic as his short story collections. The story is told plainly but the tone and quiet nature of the story really appealed to me.

I enjoyed reading about this unlikely pair. Jason is a little rough around the edges but charming and remorseful for his past actions. He comes across as very genuine and sincere. Harvey is mature and wise and the two seem to understand each other, which makes the story work so well.

In the end, all the pieces come together and what you have is a satisfying read.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: Tuesday Nights in 1980

Tuesday Nights in 1980

Tuesday Nights in 1980
By Molly Prentiss
Gallery/Scout Press, Hardcover, 9781501121043, April 2016, 336pp.

The Short of It:

If a book can give you “feels” then this is the one to do it.

The Rest of It:

Synethesia: the production of a sense impression relating to one sense or part of the body by stimulation of another sense or part of the body.

James Bennett is an art critic but one unlike the ones you’ve read about in the past. James is synesthetic. He might experience a “taste” while looking at a painting, or he might “hear” a color, instead of just simply seeing a color. This gives him an edge in the art world but it also creates problems for him and his wife, as his obsession with certain pieces take over their lives.

This was such an interesting, and absorbing read.  There are dual story lines in this novel and it is done so beautifully. It took me forever to read this one because nearly every other sentence was worthy of being highlighted. Prentiss does an amazing job capturing the New York art scene. It’s so vivid and full of life. Pulsing, really.  There’s tragedy and hope and longing and it’s all so perfectly imperfect, if that makes any sense at all.

I adored this book. I need to own a copy in print just so I can hold it because fondling my Kindle copy is just not acceptable.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.