Tag Archives: Thriller

Review: The Turn of the Key

The Turn of the Key

The Turn of the Key 
By Ruth Ware
Gallery/Scout Press, 9781501188770,  August 2019, 352pp.

The Short of It:

I needed a book that I could not put down and this was it.

The Rest of It:

Nanny stories are quite popular. Add a supernatural element, difficult kids, weird parents and a big, spooky house and you have a winner. Now add technology. I mean, cameras, apps, smart refrigerators and TVs and you up the creep factor by 100%.

Rowan finds the nanny position of a lifetime. A high-paying, live-in gig that will take her to the beautiful Scottish moors. The house is unique. An old Victorian in the front, but the back half of the house is all gleaming and new, outfitted with the latest technology. At first, Rowan is impressed by this. Sandra and Bill, architects by trade, restored what they could but re-imagined the rest but all of its gadgetry proves to be a bit much for Rowan when she is immediately tasked with watching the children for ten days while the parents are at a business conference.

Did I mention that the last four nannies all left within a two-year period? Or that the house has a history of death and violence? Or that some in the town believe it to be haunted?

This was such a fun book to read. I was completely immersed and could not turn those pages fast enough. It’s sufficiently creepy and keeps you guessing with all its plot twists. The ending felt a tad rushed but overall, I really enjoyed this one and found it to be really entertaining and fun. I read it in one day. A work day, which should tell you something.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: The Passengers

The Passengers

The Passengers
By John Marrs
Berkley, 9781984806970, August 2019, 352pp.

The Short of It:

Interesting concept. Wasn’t sure it would work well but it all came together and raised some good questions about privacy.

The Rest of It:

A select group of participants, chosen for the secrets they harbor, suddenly become hostages as their self-driving cars are overtaken by terrorists.

What added to this story is that a group of jurors have been appointed to watch their every move inside their vehicles and as their secrets are revealed, they determine whether they live or die.

Sound crazy? It is!

The pace of the story took off with a bang but then slowed down considerably as each passenger is revealed to us. Once we get past all the introductions the pace picked up again, significantly. I had mixed feelings about the story. It felt a little cold and it was hard to like anyone in the story, which affected how I felt about their chance for survival, but what the story says about privacy and what we allow technology to know about us gave me pause. This story is not that far-fetched, which is chilling.

I enjoyed The Passengers. I read it in one sitting. If you want a quick read that has a little more to it than just a lot of action, then give it a try.

Source: Review copy provided by the publisher.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.