Tag Archives: Ecco Press

Review: Bird Box

Bird Box

Bird Box
By Josh Malerman
Ecco Press, 9780062259660, February 2015, 272pp.

The Short of It:

Tense, and absolutely riveting.

The Rest of It:

I don’t know where I was when this book first came out a couple of years ago but I am so glad I finally discovered it.

The world has changed. There are monsters. If you see these creatures with the naked eye or even through a lens of any kind, you instantly go stark raving mad and kill yourself. How does one survive such a world? By living behind a blindfold for the rest of your life.

Now add children.

Now add animals.

Now add people who buck the system and want to “test” the different theories out on their own even though they’ve been warned that the outcome will not be good.

Food is running out. Potable water is an issue as well. As these people live behind blindfolds, these creatures live among them. They stand over them. They toy with them. They try to lure them out of darkness.

This is a terrifying world and I loved every tense moment. I picked this up for the RIP Challenge but it is easily one of the best books I’ve read this year.

Have you read it? If you love “end of the world” type stories but also love a good, suspenseful tale, then I beg you to run out and find a copy. Go. Right now.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: The Nest

The Nest
The Nest
By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney
Ecco Press, Hardcover, 9780062414212, March 2016, 368pp.

The Short of It:

One sibling’s poor decision ends up jeopardizing the nest egg that his other siblings have come to rely on.

The Rest of It:

Family secrets and money. The two seem to go hand in hand and that is most definitely the case here. The Plumb family is dysfunctional but also somewhat typical in that they all have their own unique issues to deal with.

When Leo’s drunk driving results in the injury of a young woman, a woman who is not his wife, the nest egg that all of this siblings expected to receive when the youngest turned forty, is instead used to keep things quiet. This upsets them and they react to the news in different ways.Threatened by their predicament, they turn towards each other for support.

This was a pretty good read. At first, it felt a little superficial but it quickly turned into something much more complex. Whenever people are thrown into a difficult situation, how they recover and what they do next says a lot about them. These siblings are forced to “make it work” and although there is worry and stress and plenty of resentment, there is also a family bond that can’t be ignored.

Overall, a very good read.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.