Tag Archives: Book Review

Review & Giveaway: Nantucket

Nantucket

Nantucket
By Nan Rossiter
Kensington Publishing Corporation, Paperback, 9781617736506, August 25, 2015, 352pp.)

The Short of It:

Nantucket is such an idyllic, beautiful locale but even though it’s always been home for Liam Tate it’s also a reminder of what was.

The Rest of It:

After losing his parents in a car accident, Liam Tate moves into his Uncle’s house on Nantucket. Together, they while away the years working on boats or fixing up the house. For Liam, it’s a happy time and he loves living on the island and can’t imagine calling any other place home.

One summer, Cadie and her family vacation on the island. After meeting Liam, it’s pretty much love at first sight but Cadie’s from a well-to-do family and Liam is just a hardworking kid working in the boatyard. Clearly, the two have little in common but their immediate attraction to one another is something Cadie’s father will not tolerate so he whisks her back to New York, far away from Liam Tate.

Liam waits for a letter or phone call but he receives nothing from Cadie. He just assumes that she’s gone off to college to live the life she was meant to live. Several years later, the two are reunited and even though many years have passed, Liam can’t help but feel something for the woman who stole his heart so long ago.

I’ve read all of Nan Rossiter’s books so I was pretty excited to get my hands on this new one. One thing you can always count on is a fabulous setting and this novel is no exception. The other thing you can count on, four-legged characters you can’t ignore. In this case, Tuck, a lovable retriever and his feline buddy, affectionately called, Mobe.

In this novel, Rossiter’s focus is Liam and Cadie’s relationship and the role of second chances. Is it possible to love again after so many years? There is a slightly weightier edge to this story than the ones I’ve read before. Liam is forced to make some very difficult decisions and you all know how much I love it when characters are pushed outside of their comfort zones.

Speaking of characters, I adored Liam. I adored his dog, Tuck. I did not adore Cadie. Gasp! Cadie was just a young girl when this all went down but I was so angry at her for not contacting Liam after she left the island. Sure, she was young but what young person listens to their parents anyway?

That said, this story is a reminder at just how quickly your life can change and how having a little bit of faith can lead you in the right direction. It’s got a fabulous setting, a little bit of romance and some soul-searching, weightier issues to consider. There’s something for everyone.

Nan has been incredibly generous with her books and is offering one copy for me to give away! If you’d like a chance to win a copy, check out the details below.


GIVEAWAY INFORMATION

This giveaway is for one copy of Nantucket and is open to the US and Canada. A winner will be chosen randomly by me. The book will come directly from the author. Only one entry per person.  Giveaway closes on August 31, 2015 (pacific). I will contact the winner for his/her mailing address.

CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY!

Source: Review and giveaway copies provided by the author.
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.

Review: Everything I Never Told You

Everything I Never Told You

Everything I Never Told You
By Celeste Ng
(Penguin Books, Paperback, 9780143127550, May 2015, 320pp.)

The Short of It:

Tragedy sometimes brings people together. Sometimes it pushes them apart.

The Rest of It:

Surprisingly, this novel is called a literary thriller by some. A bit odd since we know from page one that Lydia is dead. I suppose the facts surrounding her death could make this a thriller, but I never considered it to be one.

When Lydia goes missing, her parents and siblings realize that they don’t really know who she hangs out with or what she does after school. She’s been leading a double-life in that what she portrays to her family, particularly her father, is a portrait of a popular, smart high school student when in fact she is not popular at all and not doing well in any of her classes.

This American-Asian family is trying to fit into a 1970’s small town Ohio neighborhood and their challenges are great. Of the three siblings, Lydia is the least Asian in appearance. Blonde with blue eyes but the rest of the kids get made fun of and although the father sees it, he chooses to ignore it thinking that what his kids need is a thicker skin, and to just work on being more popular. It’s a lot of pressure for them, especially Lydia which makes the reader question if her death is self-inflicted or something else.

What’s absolutely heartbreaking about this story is that even before Lydia’s death, this family had problems and her death seems to just bring them to the forefront. This family doesn’t communicate with one another. They don’t seem to fully understand or know what is going on in the family or if they do, they are in complete denial about it. There are a lot of missed opportunities to love one another, and that’s the real tragedy in this novel. And just when you want and hope for the parents to swoop in and be parents, they fail miserably and you are left shaking your head over it.It sounds so bleak and some of it is but there is some hope for a reader to cling to.

My book club discussed this and there was plenty to talk about. The topic of mixed marriage, ethnicity in general and the pressure for kids to perform were just a few things we discussed. Most of us felt that the author did a good job of going back and forth in time and sharing just a enough of each character’s perspective to get a feel for them without giving it all away. In that sense, there was an air of mystery to the story which made me want to turn the pages faster.

In summary, it was a pretty good read and gave us plenty to discuss.

Source: Borrowed
Disclosure: This post contains Indiebound affiliate links.